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Your oasis in the Otavi mountains

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Rhinos conquer valley in the Otavi mountains
  • A white rhino cow carefully ventures outside the transport container and sniffs her new home ground

    A white rhino cow carefully ventures outside the transport container and sniffs her new home ground. Photo: Ghaub

Visitors to Ghaub pinch themselves in disbelief: Are those rhinos in the bush savannah? Yes, those are in fact rhinos. White rhinos, to be precise. They were released at the end of March, after the game sanctuary was fenced and measures for their protection were put in place.

The impressive pachyderms have in the meantime recovered from the transport and have settled well in their new surroundings. They seem completely relaxed when a game viewer vehicle approaches them. We see the rhinos on almost every game drive because every day a ranger of the "Rhino Patrol" tracks them and gives their location to the guide via radio.

White rhinos are larger, but more placid than the black rhinos mostly sighted in Etosha. In Namibia they are also the less common of the two species. Once our rhinos are used to the daily visits by humans, our guests will be able to get out of the car and approach them on foot. The guide and tracker present carefully watch their body language and immediately alert the viewers, if an animal seems nervous or irate.

With a little luck you can also see other game like eland, hartebeest, blesbok and kudu on the game drive. You are guaranteed to see an elephant, or rather the portrait of an elephant, engraved on a rock at a time when elephants still roamed the whole of Namibia.

Ghaub Lodge in new hands
  • Guest wing of Ghaub in historic style against old palm trees of the former mission station

    Guest wing of Ghaub in historic style against old palm trees of the former mission station. Photo: Ghaub

The farm Ghaub with its eponymous lodge in the Otavi mountains changes hands and thus becomes a partner of the private nature reserve Waterberg Wilderness (at the Waterberg) and the Ondekaremba Lodge (at the airport). The previous owner and former flight entrepreneur André Compion moves to South Africa because of private reasons. Operation of Ghaub Lodge continues as usual.

Ghaub is well-known for its stalactite cave, the third largest cave Namibia, which guests can explore on a guided tour. Quite remarkable for Namibia is also the cultivation of maize, which is shown together with the cattle on a farm tour. The game rich nature reserve of Ghaub is home to antelopes such as eland, red hartebeest and blesbock. With more than 250 species of birds the area is a haven for birdwatchers.

Ghaub charms its visitors by its historic atmosphere of the former mission station, built by the Rhenish Missionary Society in 1895. The whole facilities have been lovingly renovated and expanded by buildings kept in the same style.